Decline in cognitive function and elder mistreatment: Findings from the Chicago Health and Aging Project

Xinqi Dong, Melissa Simon, Todd Beck, Denis Evans

Publish Year: 2014

Objective: This study aimed to examine the longitudinal association between decline in cognitive function and elder mistreatment (EM). Methods: Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP) is an epidemiologic study conducted in a geographically defined community (N = 6,159). We identified 143 CHAP participants who had longitudinal cognitive data and EM reported to social services agency. The primary predictor was cognitive function, which was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (Perceptual Speed), and both immediate and delayed recall of the East Boston Memory Test (Episodic Memory). An index of global cognitive function scores was derived by averaging z scores of all tests. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of cognitive function domains and risk for EM. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, every one-point decline in global cognitive function (odds ratio [OR]: 1.57 [1.21-2.03]), MMSE (OR: 1.07 [1.03-1.10]), Episodic Memory (OR: 1.46 [1.14-1.86]), and Perceptual Speed (OR: 1.05 [1.02-1.07]) scores were associated with increased risk for EM. Lowest tertiles in global cognitive function (OR: 2.71 [1.49-4.88]), MMSE (OR: 2.02 [1.07-3.80]), Episodic Memory (OR: 2.70 [1.41-5.16]), and Perceptual Speed (OR: 4.41 [2.22-8.76]) scores were associated with increased risk for EM. Conclusion: Decline in global cognitive function, MMSE, and Perceptual Speed scores were associated with increased risk for EM.

Publisher:
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2012.11.004